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UPDATE: The permanent and special exhibits at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum are open to the public. The Research Room is open by appointment only. Schedule a virtual orientation prior to booking travel. We continue to respond to written requests for records at gwbush.library@nara.gov. Please check our website or archives.gov/coronavirus for updates on operating hours and status.

Organization of the Executive Office of the President (EOP)

What is the Executive Office of the President?

The Executive Office of the President, or EOP, is made up of offices that support the President.  Each office has a different function. Some offices oversee and coordinate the work of others, while some deal with domestic or foreign policy. There are administrative support offices, as well as offices that act as liaisons with the public, Congress, or members of the Cabinet. 

Presidential Records

Two laws apply to records created by the Executive Office of the President: the Presidential Records Act and the Federal Records Act.

The George W. Bush Presidential Library holds records that are governed by the Presidential Records Act. These records come from the following offices:

  • The White House Office (WHO)
  • The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA)
  • The National Security Council (NSC)
  • The Office of Administration (OA)
  • The Office of Policy Development (OPD)
  • The President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board (PFIAB)

The George W. Bush Presidential Library also holds records from the Office of Laura Bush, which supported her official duties as the First Lady.

Records created under the Presidential Records Act can’t be requested under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) until 5 years after the President left office. President George W. Bush’s records became subject to FOIA on January 20, 2014.

For more information about submitting a FOIA request for these records, please visit our “Submit a FOIA Request” page.

The Office of the Vice President also creates Presidential records, but they are not stored at the George W. Bush Presidential Library. To access Vice President Cheney’s records, please visit the National Archives and Records Administration’s website.

To submit a FOIA request for Vice Presidential records, contact the Archival Operations Division at presidential.materials@nara.gov.

Federal Records

The following offices created Federal records:

  • The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ)
  • The Office of Management and Budget (OMB)
  • The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP)
  • The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)
  • The United States Trade Representative (USTR)

If you want to access older Federal records, please visit the National Archives and Records Administration’s “Research Our Records” page to search the Catalog or contact reference staff.

Records that were created more recently may still be in the custody of the creating department or agency. Please contact the agency directly to submit a FOIA request.

What about the United States Secret Service?

The United States Secret Service is not a part of the Executive Office of the President. The Homeland Security Act of 2002 moved the Secret Service from the Department of the Treasury to the Department of Homeland Security.

The United States Secret Service creates Federal records. If you want to access Federal records, please visit the National Archives and Records Administration’s “Research Our Records” page to search the Catalog or contact reference staff.

Offices with Records at the George W. Bush Presidential Library

The White House Office (WHO)

The White House Office, or WHO, is made up of staff that directly serve and support the President. There are many offices within the WHO that advise on policy, offer administrative support, work with Congress, or communicate the President’s goals. The White House Office is overseen by the Chief of Staff, who organizes the other offices and ensures that the White House operates smoothly.

When the President has needs that are not met by the current White House Office, the WHO might be restructured. New offices might be created, or some offices might be eliminated. For example, President George W. Bush created two new offices: the USA Freedom Corps and the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. These offices promoted volunteerism and supported community and faith-based organizations.

The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA)

The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) was established by Congress in 1946. The CEA advises the President on economic policy and prepares the Economic Report of the President. There are three members, including a Chair that is appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

The National Security Council (NSC)

The National Security Council (NSC) advises the President on national security and foreign policy. President George W. Bush’s National Security Council included:

  • The President (Chair)
  • The Vice President
  • The Secretary of State
  • The Secretary of the Treasury
  • The Secretary of Defense
  • The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs
  • The White House Chief of Staff
  • The White House Counsel
  • The Assistant to the President for Economic Policy
  • The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (Military Advisor)
  • The Director of National Intelligence (Intelligence Advisor)

When it was appropriate, the Attorney General, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and heads of other executive departments and agencies were also invited to attend.

The Office of Administration (OA)

The Office of Administration (OA) provides administrative, information technology, human resources, and other support to the Executive Office of the President (EOP).

The Office of Policy Development (OPD)

President Richard M. Nixon created the Office of Policy Development (OPD) to oversee economic and domestic policy. Later, President William J. Clinton split the Office of Policy Development into the Domestic Policy Council and the National Economic Council.

The National Economic Council coordinates the President’s economic policies and ensures that they are implemented in Federal agencies.

The Domestic Policy Council (DPC) advises the President on domestic policy. Under President George W. Bush, the DPC was affiliated with the Office of National AIDS Policy, the USA Freedom Corps, and the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives.

  • The Office of National AIDS Policy oversees HIV/AIDS policy.
  • The USA Freedom Corps promoted volunteer service. Although it no longer exists, parts of the mission continue in Federal agencies and the private sector.
  • The Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives was created to make it easier for faith-based and community organizations to partner with the government. It exists today as the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships.
The President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, also called the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board (PFIAB or PIAB)

President Dwight D. Eisenhower created the President’s Board of Consultants on Foreign Intelligence Activities in 1956. The board was later renamed to the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board. President George W. Bush’s board consisted of sixteen members, who advised the President on intelligence matters.

Resources

The following carefully selected resources, some of which are from the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, provide further information about the Executive Office of the President (EOP).

Archival Research Guide

For a more detailed list of offices within the Executive Office of the President (EOP), please download the Archival Research Guide:

Additional Resources

The National Archives and Records Administration also maintains the Archived White House Website as it existed on January 20, 2009, when President George W. Bush left office. The page on the structure of the Executive Office of the President can be found here.

Sources: